Towards a Complete Architecture

Corb at Notre Dame du Haut

Corb at Notre Dame du Haut

Mies at Seagram

Mies at Seagram

Tange at his House

Tange at his House

Gropius at Fagus

Gropius at Fagus

I am a little lost in my thoughts and am just trying to move forward through visualising them. I am basing my thesis on ‘Completion’.

Question of this term: When is Architecture complete?

Any comments are welcome!

D

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4 Responses to Towards a Complete Architecture

  1. Sabrina Morreale says:

    I like this attempt ì, because you can start placing your rooms/squares inside the factory and having some protagonists and some new happenings inside. IS architecture complete when people are in it? yes. also in the case of factories? are factories complete when the human is there or when the machinery is there? perhaps it can be a nice place to start. where your statement can start like: ARCHITECTURE IS COMPLETE WHEN PEOPLE INHABIT IT. FACTORIES INSTEAD ARE COMPLETE WHEN MACHINERY IS THERE, SO THE HUMANS ARE SUBSTITUTED BY THE OBJECTS/PRODUCTS. i am not saying this, but it would be nice to think about it and having a distinction between architecture in general and factory. and the idea of compleness. architecture is made for humans, factories are made for products.

  2. Oliver Pershav says:

    “IS architecture complete when people are in it?”

    Reminds me of the legal definition of architecture in Sweden. I’m sure it is similar in other countries, but we recently had a dispute near my hometown regarding whether an installation by Chipperfield was to be considered art or architecture (and the latter therefore requiring a building permit, which the curators had not filed for). The definition: it is architecture when one can enter it. So, the curators solved the issue by permanently locking the door to the “building.” Since no-one could inhabit it, it was no longer architecture.

    Just an anecdote.