Artefacts and Landscape

De Chirico_Love Song

De Chirico_Love Song

The project explores the notion of a landscape in relation to a collection of artifacts. It questions both the ground as plinth as well as the identity of object.  The project challenges the way we perceive as well as the way we represent.

The project explores the notion of a landscape in relation to a collection of artifacts. It questions both the ground as plinth as well as the identity of object.
The project challenges the way we perceive as well as the way we represent.

natural-encounters

Magritte_Natural Encounters

Screen Shot 2016-03-02 at 17.45.11

The window exists as the mechanism through which we perceive the object. However the window or the renaissance veil can never reveal to us the whole object but can only reveal a fragment.

The grid as horizontal conditions the ground.

The grid as horizontal conditions the ground.

The grid as horizontal conditions the ground.

The grid as horizontal conditions the ground.

The grid as horizontal conditions the ground.

The grid as horizontal conditions the ground.

The grid as horizontal conditions the ground.

The grid as horizontal conditions the ground.

When thinking presentation: Museum

box.color

Thinking of Duchamps Valise Museum as a means to present the final drawings?

In addition to many 2d representations of his past works, including a number of Readymades, this Duchampian museum contains three-dimensional “miniature-replicas” of several of his famous Readymades.  I was thinking of maybe doing the same with the objects taken from the Pizza’s as a means to complement the images.

 

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One Response to Artefacts and Landscape

  1. Mark McGlynn says:

    Nice images. I was reading a book on architectural patterns and this popped up, it made me think about your project:

    Kuma reflects on the instruments used by Le Corbusier and on his having opened a process of objectification of architecture through the use of the imagination as a tool of design and communication. Conversely, the Japanese architect believes that architecture should aim for the ground to retrieve the detachment from reality. For Kuma, an “object” is an architecture that is expressly disconnected from its environment—even if objects can be found in all architectural styles.