Author Archives: ARIADNE2012-13

Working on the exhibition!

 

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Working on the exhibition!!

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Final Table Panel!!!

 

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DIP 9 Exhibition Space…

The pictures are blurred, tilt, and very badly done…don’t ask me why!

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DIP 9 Shooting Session

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White Book done…going to City Binders tomorrow morning…

 

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Animated Book Script

and the drawing that will never exist…

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Screening the Green!

set up…

 

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Street Scene…outdoor room

For now this is how the final sequence on the cinematic city presents itself…

These are some referents that I’m looking at to start drawing the street city as an outdoor room,  New York urban vitality is centered less in its celebrated towers than in the spaces nestled among them-its streets. Endless stretches of avenues are break down into small overlapping neighborhoods, giving a small-town scale to one of the world’s largest cities. The street itself becomes a well-defined outdoor room, an outdoor auditorium which decorated facades serve as a backdrop of the outdoor space of remarkable vitality, which theatricality stages the universe of interactions, the ultimate “scene” the street. Discrepant details start to creep in, as in a dream, these peculiar details reveal that we are not in the Real City.

Reference Images from the next drawings in the following films: West Side Story, Dogville, Do the Right Thing, Enter the Void, Street Scene, …

 

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Psychedelic Manhattan…

Being in Rhino for more than 8 hours trying to figure out how

to draw a deconstructed Manhattan IS dangerous!

You can end up in Photoshop adding crazy gradients!!!

aaaaaaah!!! what a journey!

Of course is a first trial, plenty of things to change, draw and redo…

 

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Rompe Hielo!

During the break I tried to consider the comments I had on previews, and make the argument of the project more edgy… thinking on the continuities and discontinuities of Film production and Editing in relation to how we experience the city, and in relation to architectural design.

I started the White book, which I didn’t update since December as I always work in the Animated book…

I have also been looking at maps and diagrams for stage sets to have some reference to be able to start the drawings which counterpart the sequences that I show on the screen. These drawings will show the Set Up of the scene, using graphic notations from theatre performance to record the event, and the film tricks used to create the visual effects…

For the Jury, I think I will present as the same way as for previews in terms of the screen, but adding the new drawings to see the set up of the scenes…

Screen Shoot of the Animated Book…

Drawings still not ready to be post…grrr…

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Chase scene sequence…

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Last Frame Waterfront Sequence

Now still need to work in the in between moment…

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Frame 2 Waterfront in process…

Thinking on drawing manhattan Island as a matte painting in the background… that won’t much with the landscape in the left side of the image…

A man with a plane, and some floating boxes (buildings) in the middle of the image,

and a filming platform and a few piers (models) in the foreground…

not sure yet…

any suggestions?

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Frame 1 Waterfront Sequence

Just real building are reflected…

 

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Next Step – Waterfront Sequence

References about the layering of the Waterfront Effect…

References for the last frame of the sequence and it’s trick…

Sketch of the 4 frames…

Frame 1: Just a Reflection (model + image) on the water…building in diagonal, strange effect,…

Frame 2:  Zoom out we see top view, boxes (model) + reflections (image)…

Frame 3: The island background…Boxes on the water, perspective effect…

Frame 4: Trick is revealed…Ari machine discovered…don’t sure yet how?! Reference above…

Any suggestion is received as a birthday present! haha!

 

 

 

 

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Updated Frame 1 Rooftop Sequence

Either this one or the other…

 

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Rooftops Sequence DRAFT…

Frame 1: We are in the highest roof of the City, we have the control over the world.

The image is still in process the idea is to show much more of the island…

Frame 2: We look down, and we feel the vertigo effect. The Top view shows the disconnection between blocs, all the same, we feel the alienation of the modern city.

Frame 3: In fact, if we look straight again, we see that we are not in the heights roof anymore. Right now we are in a ordinary low roof, where the towers invade sky and we feel the claustrophobia of being below such a crazy monsters!

Frame 4: At the end of the sequence we zoom inside one of the tower, and we realize that the scenes that we previously watch were manipulated and amplified in the film.

Any suggestion?

 

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working on the rooftop sequence…

film scene... Man on Wire 2008

Frame n 3

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167,731 STEPS!!!

Para Bailar la Bamba se necesita una poca de gracia!!

To dance La Bamba you need a little charm!

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Presentation…

Presentation; text for the images…

The City appears Uncompleted.

Real cities are now often imagined, built, and articulated based on filmic experiences. The architecture becomes a direct reflection of mental images.

The city does not exist in a pure form and needs to be filled with visual imagery, which does not necessarily follow the logic of the urban fabric.

We live in an age in which film has become the frame of reference for our urban existence, and our activities and thoughts are intertwined with screen-based realities.

With cinema we step through time and space to visit our favourite cities, we know their situations and personalities, and even when we go to visit them, we may never be able to see beyond the envelope of our previous fictive experience.

The one constant throughout New York City’s history has been its ability to change, adapt, and reinvent itself.

Manhattan becomes the inspiration for endless designs, the performance never ends, the cyclic restatement of a single theme: Manhattan a Theatre of Progress

In the 1930s, the time of the Great Depression, Hollywood created its first great portraits three thousand miles away from the real New York. The City was artificially re-created as film sets in LA.

In fact, movie-made skyscrapers were the only ones being built at this time, sustaining the public’s hope for the future of the city.

This tendency made use of film tricks and theatrical scenery to achieve spatial effects with the aim to create alternative realities to the city that exists. Creating a separation between the ‘real’ and the ‘virtual’ New York. Glorified the unreal over the real.

During the same period, visionary architects and planners of the Golden Age proved their projects to be unbuildable in a politically and economically devastating climate.

Exceptionally, a number of prominent architects, particularly in Germany and France, contributed to the film industry being able to create their imagined architectures and urban environments which benefited from the lack of constraints.

In the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the stage set phenomena started to emerge beyond the boundaries of the film set and urban spaces began to be viewed as theatrical spaces with their own narrative qualities. This manifestation was particularly found in the design of open spaces and spaces in ‘transition’ where collective social activities were taking place.

The Old Pennsylvania Station, in New York, its a great example. Conceived as a theatrical space, the station aimed to impress, to overwhelm creating an architectural drama, which celebrated the “staging” of architecture in the city

Three building types informed the design: the columnar entry gate, the ancient bath of Caracalla in Rome, and the glass-and-iron train shed. Historical elements were interwoven connecting past and present.

Its appearance was achieved with a steel skeleton and curtain wall construction.  The walls of the Station were no load bearing; granite panels were cut and inserted onto the metal structure. The essence of architectural space appears free of the functional requirements.

The waiting hall created a tectonic illusion. The deep, octagonal ceiling coffers were cast in plaster. Most of the travertine was not real travertine and the actual stone was synthetic stone mixed on site. Everything was built to achieve an appropriate scenic backdrop.

The station can be understood as a full-scale set design within the city.

In order for the world to flicker on the screen it is first cut to pieces. Objects are liberated from larger context and reinserted into a film-phrase. In the stage set the architecture is seen fragmented, sequences of elements may be linear, deconstructed, or dissociated…

We can explicitly link the cinematic spectator with a traveller among ruins.

The films featuring Penn Station act as urban archives, becoming a historic record of the city with its famous landmarks, buildings and public spaces.

Nothing above street level was needed for railroad operations. From a real estate perspective, the optimal solution was to bury the station and build a skyscraper above.

The station would be demolished and replaced with a new Madison Square Garden complex

The ruins of the universe are stored in warehouses for sets. Phantom architecture that provides alternative images to the New York that exists.

One most powerful abilities of film, is the montage, the framing and cropping of the image, and therefore, the cutting away of the spatial and temporal context. On the screen, architecture without borders can be played at infinitum.

When applied to cities, urban montage can generate urban continuity, urban cuts or urban dissolves.

In 1940s and ‘50s the powerful immediacy of wartime documentaries, and the artistic prestige of post-war Italian neo-realist, cinema started to look at more realistic tendencies, shooting on real locations within the City.

Looking for un-staged reality, the City becomes the place for filmic production and consumption.

Blurring the boundaries between the filmic space and the physical place.

Cities are increasingly defined through images, and cinema has contributes to a new perspective on how we view and engage with architectural spaces and urban environment, as well as staged authenticities.

The use of staged authenticities, the in fill of full set scale street canvas, the massive urban film advertisement strategies through the latest innovative technologies of screen evolution, such the mapping 3D projections into building facades, can be seen as a phenomenon of the City mise-en-urbanite where the city becomes a pure stage set.

To be able to have a complete experience of the city, previously manipulated images of itself need to be mentally projected.

Converting the wall into the immaterial state of the screen-ultimate window. The ‘Wall-screen’. From now on, in the time of cinematography, architecture is only a movie’ the city is no longer a theatre but the cinema of city lights.

The project is conceived as a sequence of images, which explore and reveal a new engagement with the urban environment within questions the nature of it’s architectural framework through the form of staged architectures  (realities) derived from cinematic experiences.

 

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Working on the presentation…

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Model of Manhattan almost done!

 

Such a Dalinian Plan!!! I love it!

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From Brooklyn Bridge Park towards Manhattan skyline

People Watching 9/11 Tribute in Light from Brooklyn Bridge Park

The new Brooklyn Bridge Park (an 85-acre post-industrial waterfront about 1.3 miles long) is the perfect place for photographing Manhattan skyline…and the spot chosen from the one I will start the water front sequence.

 

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Singing in the Rain…

Verticality Clip Done…Now I have to insert the drawings into the film sequence, and start the Water Front Clip…

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Color or Black and White?

The movie scene is already in Black and White, mmm…wondering if I should contrast with color images or, desaturated images with glimpses of color, or just black and white…

 

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To Infinity and Beyond…

 

I’ m still finishing the images of the Verticality Clip…photophosping them right now…having a bit more fun than in Rhino…soon the waterfront!

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Preparing Images for the Verticality Clip…

Buildings start disappearing and merging with the sky,

The celling of the warehouse encloses the city within the city,

and let us see throughout some bits of glass the outer city.

 

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Opening, Baths of Caracalla Projecting Scene at Penn Station…

1st Frame of the project: Baths of Caracalla projecting Penn Station Scene, in The Clock…Soldier Looking Towards the skyscrapers…scared goes back inside the station…

Draft images…

Complete Scene wich will be manipulated in my drawings…

 

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The scene of a Crime / The Haunted City…

Scene of the Crime, Manhatan laying down like a death body mark…WIP WIP WIP

Clue n1 Penn Station vs Bath of Caracalla…

Thinking of how to insert the scenes in different ways…

Thinking in different Techniques for Revealing the Crime…

Project Title: The scene of the crime / The Haunted City

The crime

The manipulation of reality, the appropriation and distortion of it. Pieces of architecture are ripped out of time and jumbled together in a film-phrase. The reality appears uncompleted. Some parts are missing. We will just be able to experience the city by projecting our previous fictive experiences.

The streets start disappearing and fragments of the city are erased. We realize that the city is incomplete. Dimensions are lost; buildings severely cropped, disappear in murk and are pushed to the periphery of the image. The miss-recognition of the architecture and the urban scene appear like the ‘scene of a crime.

The only way to complete the urban scene of the city will be by projecting our previous fictive experiences.

The 24 frames – Plates will start giving clues of the crime, revealing certain moment of the city, and just at the end of the project we will know which is about. Everything starts with Caracalla and end up in…

 

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Great Sentence referring to M-G-M Hollywood’s greatest Backlot…

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KILLER’S KISS (1957) Selected Scene for the animated drawing…

Throughout the 1950s, determined filmmakers sought to sidestep the traditional studio system by producing feature films on their own. Shooting without any city permits using borrowed equipment the 27 year-old photographer Stanley Kubrick filmed his first feature length film in locations across the city, from Times Square and Pennsylvania Station to the antenna-filled rooftops of lower Manhattan.

The film starts with the main character in Penn Station train shed, he starts remembering what happened the last two days, while the bad boys where persecuting him across Lover Manhattan. With these scenes we will move from Penn to Lower Manhattan, the oldest cartier of  New York.

 

The are the shoots that I’m going to project into my drawing, and now I’m going to start drawing the layers behind the scenes…the existing urban environment, and the soundstage in between the scene and the existing urban fabric…

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For Gabriel…

http://www.marcatkins.com/

Marc Atkins…Journey through a city

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Rear Window Timelapse

Footage taken from the original Rear Window…

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Collecting Screen Shoots of Penn Station Scenes

Right now, I’m collecting screen shoots from all the movies where Penn station is featured to be able to draw the story board of the Episode of Penn. This will help me to see how I move on with the rest of Manhattan, connecting Penn episode with other episodes of the city.

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Penn Station, War Victims…

Stephen Kellam’s Forever Yours

Crazy 3D model on Penn Station to commemorate the 45th anniversary of the start the  of demolition of the station…

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200.000 Phantoms! Incredible!

200.000 Phantoms

Multiple Context Footage of a Ruin…Incredible effects! but boring montage…

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Beginning of the Story Board…

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The Entire Project will be driven by 3 episodes described below.

Episode 1

Architectural Deconstruction / Construction / The Stage Set  Architecture

1st Architectural Reaction to the Medium

I am kino-eye. I am a builder. I have placed you, whom I’ve created today, in an extraordinary room, which did not exist until just now when I also created it. In this room there are twelve walls shot by me in various parts of the world. In bringing together shots of walls and details, I’ve managed to arrange them in an order that is pleasing and to construct with intervals, correctly, a film-phrase which is the room_ Dziga Vertov, 1923

The physical city in film is waiting to be deconstructed, and eventually transformed to suit the story. Film plays with isolated fragments of a given reality.

Pieces of architecture are ripped out of time and jumbled together in a film-phrase.

In order for the world to flicker on film, it is first cut to pieces in the film city. Dismantling of the world’s contents is radical. Its interconnections are suspended, its dimensions lost.

The ruins of the universe are stored in warehouses for sets, representative samples of all periods, peoples, and styles. The old and the new, copies and originals, are piled up in a disorganized heap like bones in catacombs.

Architecture is stretched and shortened, pieced together like the little stones of a mosaic. Instead of leaving the world in its fragmented state, one reconstitutes a word out of these pieces. The objects that have been liberated from the larger context are now reinserted into another one.

 

Episode 2

Perception: Uncompleted Reality / Overlay with Fictive Experiences

We Reconstruct the urban fabric of the Deconstructed city, projecting images of previous fictive experiences.

Reference to Plato‘s Allegory of the Cave

The Image of the City cannot be completed without the projection of our previous fictive experiences of the Cinematic City. We will never be able to see the city beyond the envelope of our previous fictive experience. Movies influence the way we construct images of the world and the way we operate within it.

Episode 3

Architectural Dissolution / No border between Cinematic City and Reality

2nd Architectural Reaction to the Medium

The integration of our projections of the cinematic city into the physical reality end up with the City Disappearance, converting the wall into the immaterial state of the screen-ultimate window. The ‘Wall-screen’

With the final integration of the screen and immateriality as a building material, the borders between both worlds disappear. The light of projection has melted them together.

The ancient streets disappear and the city is erased, the screen has replaced the square, architecture dematerializes, dimensions are lost. The Door, the Window and the ultimate opening, the Screen, have translated the ‘three dimensions of the constructed space into the two dimensions of a screen interface’.

Cinema substitutes material space for a new immateriality, ‘from now on, in the time of cinematographic, architecture is only a movie’ the city is no longer a theatre but the cinema of city lights.

 

I’m going to upload the main three images-visions of each episodes as soon as I finish them…

 

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FILMography

Christopher Moloney overlays sceens of the movies into the real locations…

http://philmfotos.tumblr.com/about

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

1. Case Study: From Legend to Phoenix

1.1 Real Fake Construction

1.1.1 Tectonic Illusion. Structural Inauthenticity:

1.1.2 Design: Three building types

1.2 Demolition

1.2.1 Reduced to a Subterranean Existence

1.2.2 MSG

1.3 Restoration: From Legend to Phoenix

1.3.1 Farley Post Office Conversion

1.4 Cinematic City; Films featuring Penn Station, NY:

The Clock -1945 by Vincent Minnelli (Hollywood Soundstage)

Strangers on a Train -1951 by Alfred Hitchcock (Real location)

 

2. RECON: The Ruins of the Universe are Stored in Warehouse for Sets

 

3. Film: Two Tendencies

3.1 Lumière Brothers: Realist Tendency

3.1.1 Films: Arrival of a train

3.2 Melies: Staged illusionist; Fantastic Scenery

3.2.1 Film: An impossible voyage

 

4. New York, Cinematic Cities

4.1 Shooting in Studio: Geographical license

4.1.2 City Backlot

4.1.3 Historical Context

4.1.4 Staged Realities; Cardboard Reality; Simulacra

4.1.5 Architecture can be played at infinitum; free of the functional requirements.

4.1.6 New York city is imagined

4.1.7 Films

Metropolis, 1927

Just Imagine, 1930

Child of Manhattan, 1933

42nd Street, 1933

 

4.2 Realistic Tendencies / Shooting in Real Location

4.2.3 Historic Context

4.2.4 The City becomes the Soundstage

4.2.5 Un-Staged Reality

4.2.6 Existing Architecture use as Backdrop

4.2.7 Film as historic record of the city

4.2.8 The production and consumption of space: the city as a meta-space.

4.2.9 Films

The Naked City, 1948

Manhattan, 1979

Taxi Driver, 1976

 

5. Episode 1

Comment on how we see and experience the city through the envelope of our previous fictive experiences.

5.1 Plato’s Allegory of the Cave

5.2 Uncompleted City

5.3 Cinematic City Projections into the city

 

6. Episode 2

Comment on how architecture starts reacting to the film medium

6.1 Ultimate Architecture Reaction to the Film medium

6.2 The ‘Wall-screen’

6.3 The City Disappearance

6.4 The ultimate opening, the Screen interface

6.5 Immaterial Architecture

6.6 Architecture is only a movie’ the city is no longer a theatre but the cinema of city lights.

Text: Paul Virilio

The Aesthetics of Disappearance

Lost Dimension. New York: Semiotext(e), 1991.

The Overexposed City

 

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Project Extended Table of Contents

The project questions the conflictive relationship between Film and Architecture and how they influence each other.  Arguing that different states within this relationship frame the way we see operate and construct the City in different levels. Real cities are now often imagined, built, and articulated based on reel experiences.

Project main Text: Allegory of the Cave, Plato

Project main Film references: Matrix –The Truman Show- Synecdoche New York

Precedent: Pennsylvania Station

Quote: The Fall and Rise of Pennsylvania Station represents the entire Island of Manhattan in a sense of reality waiting to be deconstructed and eventually transformed.

Real Fake Construction

Tectonic Illusion- Structural Inauthenticity: Steel skeleton with curtainwall construction

Design: Three building types; Architectural drama connecting Past and Present.

Columnar Entry Gate

The Ancient Bath of Caracalla

The Glass-and-Iron Train Shed

Demolition

Reduced to a Subterranean Existence – Virtual space beneath the Garden

MSG: The city’s identity glorifies the unreal over the real with the reinvention of the environment as themed entertainment.

Cinematic City; Films featuring Penn Station, NY:

Like urban archaeologists, cinema came closest to the ‘reality’ of urban. Film became a historic record of the city with its famous landmarks, buildings and public spaces. We can explicitly link the cinematic spectator with a traveller among ruins. Early explorers of film were received, like photography, as true-to-life documents and therefore as scientific proof. ‘Reality’ became a synonym for “Actuality”.

THE CLOCK – 1945 by Vincent Minnelli (Hollywood Soundstage)

STRANGERS ON A TRAIN – 1951 by Alfred Hitchcock (Real location)

RECON

The Ruins of the Universe are Stored in Warehouse

Restoration: From Legend to Phoenix

Farley Post Office Conversion

 

 

Introduction to the Project

No medium has ever captured the city and the experience of urban modernity better than film. Movies influence the way we construct images of the world, and in many instances they influence how we operate within it.

When the medium of film was discovered two main tendencies were operative by two main pioneers on the medium.

Lumière Brothers: Strict realist tendency, unstaged reality. Observer of events, camera records real events, real streets

Films: Arrival of a train

George Melies : Staged Illusionist specialized in Fantastic Scenery. First man to explore magic tricks and cinematic devices which reaming theatre scenery. Papier mache universe

Film: An impossible voyage

Both tendencies affected the way the Cinematic City was presented on the screen. Both created different relationships between architecture and film, influencing as in different ways of experiencing and perceiving the city

New York is the inspiration of endless designs we can see how both tendencies have affected the city and the way we operate with it.

 

1st Tendency

Shooting in Studio / the City is Simulated inside a Soundstage/ City Backlot

Historical Context: 1920-30. After the Great Depression, 1930 the movie-made city, Hollywood, offered a place in which to ascend upward, and onward. In fact movie-made skyscrapers were the only ones made at that time, sustaining the public’s hope for the Future of the city, and themselves.

To be able to represent reality, the city is simulated in a controlled environment.

Staged Reality / Cardboard Reality / Simulacra

Separation between the ‘real’ and the ‘reel’ New York

In Staged Reality: Architecture is subordinated to the production of appearance, where architecture can be played at infinitum; the aim is to create alternative realities to the city that exists. The essence of architectural space appears free of the functional requirements. Architecture bears no load, no foundations, its staircases go nowhere and its corridors end in painted perspectives.

The City is amplified, with geographical license and made outside the real city. Hollywood created the first great portraits of the city in the late 1920s, where movie studios where miles away from the real New York. The city is imagined

Films

Metropolis, 1927- Just Imagine, 1930Child of Manhattan, 1933 – 42nd Street, 1933

 

2nd Tendency

Realistic Tendencies / Shooting in Real Location

The City becomes the Soundstage

Historic Context: 1940-50. Following Post-War II, and the development of Italian neo-realistic films.

The Real City is conceived as a Soundstage/ Un-staged reality

Existing Architecture use as Backdrop

Film as historic record, realistic document, the city with its famous landmarks, buildings and public spaces, there was no stage, simply the street.

Production, Performance and Urban Stage: New York came to serve as a ‘celluloid stage’.

Shooting in Real location, Manhattan becomes a theatre of progress. The performance can never end, the cyclic restatement of a single theme: creation and destruction irrevocably interlocked. The raw urban experience of the metropolis is captured.

The production and consumption of space: the city as a meta-space.

Films

The Naked City, 1948 – Manhattan, 1979 – Taxi Driver, 1976

 

Episode 1

The Allegory of the cave _Plato 

The Image of the City cannot be completed without the projection of our previous fictive experiences of the Cinematic City.

We will never be able to see the city beyond the envelope of our previous fictive experience. Movies influence the way we construct images of the world.

Images of the Uncompleted City are completed and animated with the projection of the Cinematic City.

Episode 2

Ultimate Architecture reaction to the Film medium

The ‘Wall-screen’ and the City Disappearance

The ancient streets disappear and the city is erased, the screen has replaced the square, architecture dematerializes, dimensions are lost. The Door, the Window and the ultimate opening, the Screen, have translated the ‘three dimensions of the constructed space into the two dimensions of a screen interface’.

Cinema substitutes material space for a new immateriality, ‘from now on, in the time of cinematographic, architecture is only a movie’ the city is no longer a theatre but the cinema of city lights.

 

 

 

 

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Screen Shoots of The Animated Book – Presentation

Right now I’m updating the table of contents of my project, and drawing a story board to be able to start focussing  more on production rather than argument,… grrr!

 

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The Overexposed City

Projection Mapping

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I found the light after the shadows…

 

Learning how to create light-shadows-reflections in Rhino-V-ray to start next drawing!

 

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Penn Station set for The Clock (1945) MGM built in Culver City

 

A soldier, Joe Allen (Robert Walker), on a 48-hour leave meets Alice Mayberry (Judy Garland) in Penn Station when she trips over his duffel bag and breaks the heel off one of her shoes.

According to Robert Osborne, in his introduction of this film on Turner Classic Movies, because World War II had not yet ended, filming on location was not considered cost-effective or easy. Consequently, the Penn Station set was built inside one of the large sound stages at MGM Studios in Culver City, California.

 

Culver City Backlots

 

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Reference…

 

I just started to feel better after the entire weekend trying to recover… I could advance new work, but I will post some of the references we discuss last tutorials. Tomorrow I will start to draw the story board of the project…

 

Richard Estes  Reflections

Reflections are a great method to be able tot reveal both cities simultaneously in one image, giving the audience an estrangement effect, were consciously they will need to observe to understand.

Gregory Crewdson

Light and shadow will be the main device to reveal the differences between cities, which are the most powerful tool to empathise and create atmospheres and character in film techniques.

 

 

 

 

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WIP…

Both cities are always going to be drawn in the same paper, we will always see them separately, in one side, the physical reality, while in the other side, the cinematic city, just by folding the plans, and seeing them overlapped we will understand the argument. We cannot experience the city without the envelope of our previous fictive experiences.

 

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Writting the Plot. WIP

Setting

The Plot takes place in Manhattan, the most filmic city in the world where two cities exist simultaneously occupying the same geographical space” the City of the Physical World and the Cinematic city”

Each of the cities operates independently with different codes, scales, and times, overlapping their structures, however they had become completely constitutive, in such a way that they can just be perceived and experienced as one single City.

From a physical standpoint, little differentiates the two cities, other than slight differences of architecture, time lapses, light perceptions…however the separation between these two cities is becoming more and more emphasized trough time changing their atmosphere and character through it’s architectural treatment.  Those who do not know about the separation might naturally view the two cities as one.

Is just in very special occasions, usually by accident, when one of the cities is revealed by it’s own, and discovered without the other, is within this very particular moments where the inhabitant feels alienated, the ‘unseen’, the fade into the background, comes to a foreground an it’s presented by it’s own.

We could say, as China Miéville describes in The City and The City, that three main regions compose both cities. The areas, which belong to the physical city (Total Areas), in which the observer currently works and lives. The filmic areas (Alter Areas), which are completely in the other city, normally unseen and ignored and finally the in-between areas (Crosshatch Areas) where they come together. These areas that exist in both cities usually go under different names in each of the cities.

However there are also a few buildings, which exists in both cities under the same name. Performing in different ways at the same time becoming a “border” or a “portal” from where both cities can be perceived individually.

Being in this border is the only way in which one can consciously and officially pass from one city to another. Passing through the border passage takes travelers, geographically to the exact place they started from, but in a different city.

 

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New York Film Location Maps

 

These maps give an overview of the most filmic city in the world, and how the cinematic city lives within the physical city of New York. Both coexist together, and become mutually representative.

 

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Understanding the Plot…

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The Plot will be a 21st century adaptation of Plato Allegory.

 

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4 levels of reality…

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Filmstrip Series…

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Slide-Show Presentation…

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Planning the performance…

Inhabiting the 4th wall installation.

Performance to be done after the jury…

4 Levels of Reality

The performance

Four screens will show four different levels of reality explained afterwards. In the middle of the room we can see a large model. Ari has generated an installation, which will show us different perceptions of the city. She is going to be moving the camera inside and trough the model. The Fog machine will be on. The different filtered lightings will give atmosphere to the performance.

Screen One / The making off the Performance, recorded during the event will be played.

Screen Two / The View Point of the Camera. Real time. A camera is situated in a rail, traveling inside the model, which will show us different realities / Fictions of Manhattan.

Screen Three / The Fiction. The images from the view point of the camera will be previously recorded and post-produced with special effects, music, and so on…

Screen Four / The Audience. A camera is located in front of the Audience, making them part of the event.

Sketch coming Soon…

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Drawing the Filmstrip…WIP

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Revised statement…after Charles workshop…WIP

Real cities are now often imagined, built, and articulated based on reel experiences. The essence of architectural space appears free of the functional requirements. Film architecture bears no load, no foundations, its staircases go nowhere and its corridors end in painted perspectives. The technical restrictions and limitations of the professional do not exist. The architecture becomes a direct reflection of mental images, memories and dreams, turning the city into a filmstrip itself, captured by it’s frames, isolated from time and space.

With cinema we step through time and space to visit our favourite cities, we know their situations, personalities and eccentricities, and even when we go to visit them, we may never be able to see beyond the envelope of our previous fictive experience. We know these cities as projected fictions. We can explicitly link the cinematic spectator with a traveller among ruins; the cinema both creates and feeds on the ruins of earlier notions of space, perception, and movement.

Manhattan becomes the inspiration for endless designs; its architecture sans frontiers can be played at infinitum. The artificial two-dimensional order of the city creates undreamt freedom for three-dimensional anarchy. This phenomenon generates the city’s identity, glorifying the unreal over the real, while in the ordinary world, the boundaries between reality and fiction have started to merge and become blurred. Everything is destined to reappear as simulation, you wonder if what you see is the reality itself or not (1)

The imaginary boundary between any fictional work and its audience is called the fourth wall. Breaking this wall is considered a technique of metafiction, were the audience can penetrate the boundaries normally set up by works of fiction. Disclosing and making obvious the manipulative and “fictive” qualities of the medium alienates the viewer from the self-contained narrative, making him aware of what he is watching, and forcing him into a critical and analytical frame of the mind. By contrary, the acceptance of the transparency of the fourth wall allows the observer to enjoy the fiction as if they were observing real events.

Films influence the way we construct images of the world, and in many instances they influence how we operate within it. This applies not only to the connection between the two, but also to how these forms of experience have become co-dependent. The cinematic realm is an integral constituent of the urban environment, revealing much about both urban theory and the urban condition.

Dealing with the in-between space of both, fiction and reality helps to reconfigure reality, and vice versa.  Recognizing that the line between the real and the virtual has fundamentally eroded, and that the two have become mutually constitutive, and considering how the real city and the reel city reference each other in an act of mutual representation and definition, I will be dealing with the space between the real and the fiction and the audience and the fiction, by expanding it, zooming in, paying attention to it and making it a new place, bringing the viewer the possibility of become fully aware and as a participant in the fictional event.

 

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From Legend to Phoenix

“Manhattan is an accumulation of possible disasters that never happen.”

Rem Koolhaas,  Delirious New York_ A Retroactive Manifesto for Manhattan

The City as a Theatre

The fall and rise of Pennsylvania Station represents the entire Island of Manhattan in a sense of reality waiting to be deconstructed and eventually transformed. The site embodies Manhattan continuous cycle of cannibalism and consequently rebuilding; by building – destroying – remaking – recycling…this dynamic conception of architecture brings architecture to its limits and perhaps all architecture rather than being about functional standards, is the result of mental constructions that have taken over the reality in a continuous loop between reality and imagination. The artificial two-dimensional order of the city creates undreamt freedom for three-dimensional anarchy.

We don’t know when our sense of reality began to fray, but at some point it was decided that reality was not the only option, that one could substitute with a more pleasant product. Selective fantasy replaced reality as a more profitable American cityscape. This Phenomenon generates the city’s identity, glorifying the unreal over the real with the reinvention of the environment as themed entertainment. ‘Everything is destined to reappear as simulation, you wonder if the world itself isn’t advertising a copy for some other world’_Baudrillard

What the perfect fake or impeccable restoration lacks are the hallmarks of time and place. Wiped out all the incidents of life and change. There is nothing left of the journey from there to here, nothing that palpably joins the past to the present, that makes direct physical and emotional contact with the viewer.

 

The City Filmstrip

The city becomes a filmstrip of episodes, each with its own particular life span. Each block is covered with several layers of phantom architecture in the form of past occupancies, aborted projects and popular fantasies that provide alternative images to the New York that exists. A single mutation on a building block affects all others as a latent possibility. One of the most visible aspects of the strip cityscape is its use of dramatic architecture.

The strip is conceived as a bounded island landscape, a convenient analytical box for investigating cultural and biological change. The things that appear here do not belong to reality. They are copies and distortions that have been ripped out of time and jumbled together. These objects and places are mute, hollow history. The real world is only one of the many possibilities that can be moved back and forth; the city would remain incomplete if one were to accept reality as a finished product.

The ruins of the universe are stored in warehouses for sets, representative samples of all periods, peoples, and styles. In order for the world to be shown on the screens, it is first cut to pieces in the film city space to accomplish the American desire to reconstruct urban experience to achieve an ideal past, and a hyper real reality. Far from a prior reality the city itself is a construct of the parallel projected hard and soft fictions of architecture and film.

 

The Fourth Wall

The imaginary boundary between any fictional work and its audience is called the fourth wall. Breaking this wall is considered a technique of metafiction, were the audience can penetrate the boundaries normally set up by works of fiction and take consciousness of the unauthentic reality we have started to inhabit. By contrary, the acceptance of the transparency of the fourth wall allows the observer to enjoy the fiction as if they were observing real events. Umberto Eco, has suggested that in America, in particular, things that look real become real even if they have never existed.

Real cities are now often imagined, built, and articulated based on reel experiences, where the essence of architectural space appears free of the functional requirements, technical restrictions and limitations of the professional conventions of architects. The architecture becomes a direct reflection of mental images, memories and dreams turning the filmstrip into the city itself, isolated from time and space.

 

 

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White book thumbnails…

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Extremely long statement waiting to be deconstructed…

“Manhattan is an accumulation of possible disasters that never happen.”

Rem Koolhaas,  Delirious New York_ A Retroactive Manifesto for Manhattan

We don’t know when our sense of reality began to fray. We don’t know when we have lost or interest in it, but at some point it was decided that reality was not the only option that it was possible, permissible, and even desirable to improve on it; that one could substitute with a more agreeable product. The replacement of reality with selective fantasy is a profitable American phenomenon. Glorifying the unreal over the real with the reinvention of the environment as themed entertainment.

The Fall and Rise of Pennsylvania Station represents the entire Island of Manhattan in a sense of reality waiting to be deconstructed and eventually transformed. This dynamic conception of architecture brings architecture to its limits and perhaps all architecture rather than being about functional standards is about mental constructions based on fictional experiences.

Baudrillard has outlined a progression by which this disengagement occurs, and by which a disassociation between representation and reality is produced. He has argued it begins with a representation that is a reflection of reality; moves on to the perversion of that reality when the original is no longer present, and finally ends with the simulacrum, a form of representation with no further relationship to the original.

‘Everything is destined to reappear as simulation, you wonder if the world itself isn’t advertising a copy for some other world’

What the perfect fake or impeccable restoration lacks are the hallmarks of time and place. Wiped out all the incidents of life and change. There is nothing left of the journey from there to here, nothing that palpably joins the past to the present, that makes direct physical and emotional contact with the viewer.

The imaginary boundary between any fictional work and its audience is called the fourth wall. This wall is originally situated at the front of the stage in a traditional three-walled box, through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play.  Just by breaking this wall, which is considered a technique of metafiction, the audience can penetrate the boundaries normally set up by works of fiction and take consciousness of the unauthentic reality we have started to inhabit. To be able to break the wall, an alienation effect needs to be provoked, so the audience can no longer have the illusion of being the unseen spectator of the event, which is really taking place. By disclosing and making obvious the manipulative contrivances and “fictive” qualities of the medium, the actors alienate the viewer from any passive acceptance.

This effect of making the familiar strange serves a didactic function insofar as it teaches the viewer not to take the style and content for granted, since the medium itself is highly constructed. But the particulars of a spectator’s psyche and of the tension aroused by a specific alienating device may actually increase emotional impact.

By contrary, the acceptance of the transparency of the fourth wall is part of the suspension of disbelief between a fictional work and an audience, allowing the observer to enjoy the fiction as if they were observing real events. Umberto Eco, also continuing in this conceptual framework, has suggested that in America, in particular, things that look real become real even if they never existed. Real cities are now often imagined, built, and articulated based on reel experiences, where the essence of architectural space appears free of the functional requirements, technical restrictions and limitations of the professional conventions of architects. The architecture becomes a direct reflection of mental images, memories and dreams.

The architecture of the mind takes place in a real fake space created in a very specific stip of Manhattan, where the rail lines nourished the city’s past-present and future. The conquest of the region was possible only after the railroad conquered a number of geological, technological, and engineering hurdles: the ability to overcome rivers, silt, and bedrock; to harness electricity to power trains; and to build tunnels underwater. The Pennsylvania Sation changed the law of nature; it annihilated the water barrier and reshaped the landscape of New York into a continuous network of rail connections, creating a complete fake environment, with an artificial sun, computerized weather systems,…

One of the most visible aspects of the strip cityscape is its use of dramatic architecture. The designation means they have features that do not exist elsewhere in the world but inside the strip. The stip is conceived as a bounded island landscape, a convenient analytical box for investigating cultural and biological change. The things that appear here do not belong to reality. They are copies and distortions

that have been ripped out of time and jumbled together. These objects and places simply do not resonate. They are mute. They are hollow history. It is this resonance that gives an object “the power to reach out beyond its formal boundaries to a larger world, to invoke in the viewer the complex, dynamic cultural forces from which it has emerged.” Stephen Greenblatt. The real world is only one of the many possibilities that can be moved back and forth; the game would remain incomplete if one were to accept reality as a finished product. The ruins of the universe are stored in warehouses for sets, representative samples of all periods, peoples, and styles. In order for the world to be shown on the screens, it is first cut to pieces in the film city space to accomplish the American desire to reconstruct urban experience to achieve an ideal past, and an hyper real reality.

 

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4th wall…arght…

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the 4th wall…wi…i….p…ppp!

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HTS!! The Truman Show Delusion

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Drawing HTS Submission…

Towards infinity and beyond

The use of perspective drawing implies the use of a grid, where all the objects need to sit. All the objects represented now are constrained by the construction of this grid, which is the maximum order or representation. The Infinity cove is designed to give the impression that the background of an object extends to infinity. Both the grid and the infinity cove can be seen as the exact same thing.

 

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WIP

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Inhabiting the 4th Wall

 

Work in progress…

 

 

Reference:

Menzies, The Thief of Bagdad 192

 

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Diagrams showing the different conditions of the Fourth Wall…

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The Reconstruction of the Rope Setting.

 

I’m going to be working on the plans as a Reconstruction of the Setting, in this plan of the Rope we can see how New York skyline is recreated by means of a semicircular cyclorama, 1200 sq in size, three times the size of the flat itself.  The layer in front represents three dimensional miniaturized models of Manhattan building to give more sense of reality. Finally the set which is constructed as a mobile stage, which allowed walls to be moved during the shoot.

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What’s inside?

Tropical Islands Resort is an artificial tropical resort in KrausnickGermany. It is said to have the world’s largest tropical indoor pool which can accommodate up to 8,000 visitors a day. The air is kept at a warm 25 °C (77 °F). Tropical Islands is open all day, every day of the year

The following image is not from tropical Island, it’s a set of The Truman Show…incredible similitude…

 

 

 

 

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Statement: Breaking the 4th Wall / WIP

 

 

My Project will challenge and confront some of the creative opportunities inherit by braking the 4th wall and opening of the third space, the space of production, the space of illusion.

The fourth wall is the imaginary “wall” at the front of the stage in a traditional three-walled box set in a proscenium theatre through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play; it’s basically the imaginary boundary between any fictional work and its audience.

By altering and breaking the fourth wall, I will set up different degrees of transparency of the wall, changing it’s opacity or completely breaking the imaginary line which compete separates the audience and the fictional world, and the line will start to blur, overlap and finally hybridize.

“Breaking the fourth wall” is considered a technique of metafiction, as it penetrates the boundaries normally set up by works of fiction. By breaking the wall we will discover what was walling in or walling out, what was hidden, prohibited, we will be able to see trough all the different layers which made the fiction came true.

By doing this experiment we will experience what this revealing process give us as an audience. The progress of realism in staging has meant that the participation of audiences has been increasingly controlled and excluded in the service of an illusion of reality. In some ways, the concept of theatrical realism has had its ultimate fulfilment in the motion picture.

The acceptance of the transparency of the fourth wall is part of the suspension of disbelief between a fictional work and an audience, allowing them to enjoy the fiction as if they were observing real events. Although the critic Vincent Canby described it in 1987 as “that invisible screen that forever separates the audience from the stage,” postmodern art forms frequently either do away with it entirely, or make use of various framing devices to manipulate it in order to emphasize or de-emphasize certain aspects of the production, according to the artistic desires of the work’s creator.

 

 

 

 

 

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Figuring out how to draw the 4th wall using Tati, Playtime as a basis…

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unbelievable news…

An elderly couple in Wenling, Zhejiang province, are the latest people in China to refuse to sign an agreement to allow their home to be demolished, resulting in the authorities building a planned road around the building.Dingzihu is the Chinese term for households that refuse to move out during demolition and literally means ‘nail house’ – ie they stick out.

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/gallery/2012/nov/22/chinese-citizens-refuse-demolition-homes-in-pictures#/?picture=399880690&index=0

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Main References on how the City is Eaten by the Construct of the Screen City

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Rewriting the statement …

The Construct of Screen City take’s over New York

Describing the spatial ambiguity between the screen city and the real city…

There have been many complex relationships between architecture-film-city along the history; the one I found more intriguing is in the side of the production of them and the technologies of the storytelling. How one feeds the other, and how much they need each other. How to build a screen city? There are many different method of reinventing a city, from using real locations of the city itself and transforming them to suit the atmosphere of the story, to simulate part of the selected cities in a soundstage in a smaller scale to be able to work in a completely controlled environment, to even start using free backlots of the city to recreate parts of the story.

One of the most common questions on the subject is how and on what grounds architecture should meet film? And the answer to the questions must be the city itself. But are architecture and film simply the representational servants of a prior reality of city? And further, as the novel was said to eclipse architecture as the primary vehicle of civic representation in the early 19th century, does film now doubly leave architecture in the shadows, perhaps as no more than a scenic backdrop for the actions by which film captures the city in flux? Or is it more likely that far from a prior reality the city itself is a construct of the parallel projected hard and soft fictions of architecture and film? What will happen if the creation of the fiction takes over the real city? Will both worlds show an urban integration?

New York has certainly been the city that has most inspired film-makers, from King Vidor to Luc Besson, including Alfred Hitchcock, John Schlesinger, Sidney Lumet and Spike Lee. But This common fate binding the city and the cinema cannot find a better embodiment than in the works of Martin Scorsese and Woody Allen, they come out as the auteurs of a real New York work.

The production of film binds the real architecture of the city, with the fictional idea of the modern city that the filmmaker has. With cinema we step back in time and space to visit our favorite cities, London, Paris, Berlin, New York, Rome… We know their situations, their personalities their eccentricities, even their pathologies so well, and yet, even when we come to visit one or other of them, we may never venture beyond the envelope of our fictive experience. Even the movies that are about our home city depict a strange place not of our actuality.

I imagine the City of New York becoming a huge set able to define all the possible histories and geographies collapsing past, present and future, a vast scale no ‘real city’ which flexibility will permit to shoot any kind of story. By setting up the stages, the construct in service of the fiction is gradually re-appropriating the real world. The images of the sets, will act as a mirror for architects to see how we can see buildings and cities reinvented on the screen.

New York is conceived as the biggest soundstage ever built, in New York, the Mayor’s Office of Film bids against rival cities and studio lots to bring location work to its streets. (Propaganda) There is a certain degree of nostalgia and idealization of the metropolis by itself, and is one of the unique place where a magic melting-pot in which life mixes with the supernatural world of fiction comes together as an homage to this relationship between film-architecture-city. However the contrasting styles from both worlds will question it’s own urban integration, as we know from reading Moby Dick: ‘true ‘ places never are … in any map’. The limitations of the sound stage will be the water, the island itself; another city limit is the all too celebrated Manhattan skyline, where the rooftops will be urban equivalents to hills…

 

In 1964, for Playtime, Jacques Tati built with the help of his architect/art-director, Eugene Roman, an extraordinary setting which, in Tati’s own words, was the ‘real star of the film’.

It was gigantic, and became known as ‘Tativille’, possibly after Godard’s Alphaville (1965) But, of course, it wasn’t just any city; it was the city Jacques Tati needed to continue to explore his idea of the modern city, and, in order to get the shot that he required, the office blocks were in fact on wheels and tracks and could be moved at will. No ‘real city’ could have given him that flexibility. It was a gigantic enterprise.

In the case of Playtime, he offers the vision of individuals gradually reappropriating for themselves bland and uniform spaces -the little old lady at the street comer, or the scene in the drugstore, which he felt ultimately one could not mistake for a drugstore anywhere in the world other than France.

Finally, I would say that Tati as a chronicler, a critic of modern architecture and a humorous observer of his time offered us a good example of an architectural vision reinterpreted through the eyes of a film-maker, in which the film acts as a mirror for architects who can see buildings and cities reinvented on the screen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mise en abyme

 

Macrocosm and microcosm is an ancient Greek Neo-Platonic schema of seeing the same patterns reproduced in all levels of the cosmos, from the largest scale (macrocosm or universe-level) all the way down to the smallest scale (microcosm or sub-sub-atomic or even metaphysical-level). In the system the midpoint is Man, who summarizes the cosmos.


 

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Manhattan Inside the Stage, towards Penn Station Doorway…

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Suggested title for the project: “Breaking the Fourth Wall” or “Mise en Abyme”

Inspired in metatheater theories…

The fourth wall is the imaginary “wall” at the front of the stage in a traditional three-walled box set in a proscenium theatre, through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play. (In that case the making off of The fall and Rise of Pennsylvania Station Script)

The idea of the fourth wall was made explicit by philosopher and critic Denis Diderot and spread in 19th-century theatre with the advent of theatrical realism, which extended the idea to the imaginary boundary between any fictional work and its audience.

The City of Manhattan becomes a Theater were dramatic stories succeed, but sometimes, by playing with the revealing moments of the making off and zooming out, the audience engages with the fictional-real side of the project and the context rather than being the city is the stage…

Speaking directly to or otherwise acknowledging the audience through the camera in a film or television program, or through this imaginary wall in a play, is referred to as “breaking the fourth wall” and is considered a technique of metafiction, as it penetrates the boundaries normally set up by works of fiction.

 

Another possible title could be Mise en Abyme

 

Mise en abyme also mise en abîme is a term originally from the French and means “placed into abyss”.

The commonplace usage of this phrase is describing the visual experience of standing between two mirrors, seeing an infinite reproduction of one’s image, but it has several other meanings in the realm of the creative arts and literary theory. In Western art history, “mise en abyme” is a formal technique in which an image contains a smaller copy of itself, the sequence appearing to recur infinitely.

 


 

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Monumental gateway into the heart of Manhattan…

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While we raze the old and raise the new…

 

No-stop City reduced the capitalist city to a continuous urban field meant to dissolve the built structure of the city into its constitutive infrastructural elements – column, elevator, wall, etc., by envisioning the city as a vast, artificially lit, air-conditioned interior. Differences such as inside and outside, landscape and city, production and consumption, living and working, were collapsed into one equipped surface that was meant to be extendable in all directions along its underlying grid, which represented the most generic order possible…

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IFCCA Prize Competition for the Design of Cities, Eisenman Architects

Yet another unrealized design is the winning entry by Eisenman Architects in the IFCCA (International Foundation for the Canadian Center for Architecture) Prize Competition for the Design of Cities in 1999. Peter Eisenman has long been the most intellectual American architect and this design for the exposed railyards that lead into Penn Station just to the south of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center is more appropriate than ever now that the city’s proposal for a stadium for the New York Jets football team on the waterfront part of this site has been abandoned. The plan combined a stadium, an expansion of the convention center, parks and many other uses and both stretched out into the river and thematically brought the river into the city by means of its smooth and undulating design.

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Working in the Studio.

Production at Shepperton Studios and Pinewood Studios on Academy Award®-winner Martin Scorsese’s 3D adventure film Hugo included the use of  7 stages and the backlots at Shepperton plus 3 stages at Pinewood. Sets that were built included the train station, clock exteriors interiors, the book store, toy shop, the greenhouse studio and circus grounds on the backlot.


 

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I can’t post the videos, to heavy! Sorry about that…

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Comments on Inception

The Architect is the designer of the dream space into which a dreamer brings a subject. An architect is similar in this regard to a video game designer, with the dream representing different levels within the game, complete with all the aesthetic and tactile details. The subject is brought into that dream space and fills it with details from their own subconscious and memories.

The architect does not have to design using real world architecture and physics, allowing them to create paradoxes like an endless staircase.

When bringing a mark into the dream, a skilled architect is essential to help the dreamer make the dream feel real. Furthermore, an architect can help design mazes or other secure locations in which the mark hides his or her secrets. The mark subconsciously hides his or her secrets in a secure location, and the deeper or more important the secret, the better or more secure the location must be in order to lure the mark into populating it with their secrets.

The architect often fulfills the role of the dreamer during a heist, but the architect can also teach their designs to another to dream.

 

 

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Jury Comments

The Jury made comments around the Technology of Story Telling. From the Hero’s journey monomyth, to going down levels like in game mapping, Dante’s Inferno and his nine circles going down the hell, towards issues of author and audience, reveling, reconfiguring, and restoring the story-world-dreams… From video games, to meta-theater and films like (Inception and Matrix)… What I found more interesting is to investigate the idea of find innovative ways of story telling, and going back on levels…

 

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