Author Archives: Yoo Jin Lee

V.P.

 

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Storyboard

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Prison WIP

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Plan Variations WIP

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White Book WIP

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Theatrical Scenery

 

Robert Edmond Jones, Neil Patel, Josef Svoboda

Robert Edmond Jones,  Tony Walton

Edward Gordon Craig

Sebastiano Serlio

 

 

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Re-Con Models

 

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Via Speer (third sketch)

 

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Via Speer (second sketch)

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Via Speer (first sketch)

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The Magic Mountain & Catoptric Device

“We walk and walk – how long has it been now? How far? It does not matter. And at every step, nothing changes – ‘there’ is ‘here,’ monotony of space. Where uniformity reigns, movement from point to point is no longer movement; and where movement is no longer movement, there is no time.” – The Magic Mountain, Thomas Mann

“The mind, as monad, was represented as an entire world simply because, through multiple reflections, it had the capacity to represent and imagine the whole world within its bounds. In fact, for Deleuze, monadic space is the architectural idea [of] a room in black marble, in which light enters only through orifices so well bent that nothing on the outside can be seen through them, yet they illuminate in color the decor of a pure inside. …  then monadic interiors are an inside without an outside: this inside is pure, it is the closed interiority, its walls hung with spontaneous folds, of a soul or a mind.” – Baroque Topographies, Georges Teyssot

“There is an outside and an inside, and myself in the middle, this is perhaps what I am, the thing that divides the world in two, on one side the outside, on the other the inside, it can be thin like a blade, I am neither on one side nor on the other, I am in the middle, I am the wall, I have two faces [surfaces] and no depth.” – The Unnamable, Samuel Beckett

 

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Shelving…

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Shelving Models (wip)

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Volkshalle 3D Printed

As a side note: when I revisited the workshop to collect the model, the technician told me one of the professors saw this model and was furious because he mistook it as a student’s design and it resembles too much of someone else’s. Perhaps we should also be furious with Speer.. or could he rationalise his design by his ruin-value theory?

 

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Speer’s Collage (draft)

…using Rossi’s Citta Analoga as a visual reference.

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Speer’s Prison Cell (draft)

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Speer’s Memoir

 

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Power +

“Politics will eventually be replaced by imagery. The politician will be only too happy to abdicate in favor of his image, because the image will be much more powerful than he could ever be.” – Marshall McLuhan, 1971

 

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Source: Volume 5. Architecture and Power I.


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Power Seating & Chair

“Power is all about the chair. To exercise power you need a chair. You can keep it, give it up, or take one from someone else. Chairs are always working. The ultimate sign of power is to rarely sit in your chair. Real power is the ability to organize the chairs of others.”

 

“Architects seek a connection to power by designing polemical chairs and trying to look relaxed in them. An architect without a chair is naïve, modest, or a genius.”

Source: Volume 5. Architecture and Power I.


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A Foreign Affair

A Foreign Affair, 1948

– Aerial View of Berlin (1:40-, 3:34-)

– Ride (6:52-)

– Building Destroyed (0:00-)

– Tour of Berlin (5:43-)

– Street at Night (3:42-)

 

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Architecture of Doom

Undergångens arkitektur (“The Architecture of Doom”), 1989

“This award-winning documentary explores the inner workings of the Third Reich and illuminates the Nazi aesthetics in the visual arts, architecture, and popular culture. Peter Cohen argues that the difficulty in defining Nazism in traditional political terms was due to an overlooked but tremendously powerful motivation beyond the scope of politics––the force of an extreme aesthetics of beauty. Building on this Nazi cult of the beautiful, The Architecture of Doom explores the eccentric cultural ambitions of Hitler’s Third Reich.”

“Architecture of the New Germany” (3:58-) (5:02-) (6:05-)
“Antiquity & Ruin-Value” (0:02-, 5:10-)
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“Visit to Paris” (1:57-)
“Degenerate Art” (1:33-) (4:32-)
“Man and Art; Sculpture” (0:08-, 1:12-)
“War Art” (3:24-)
“Post World War II Berlin” (0:03-, 0:14-)
“Conclusion / Summary” (0:52-)

 

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Ruinenwert

Ruin-Value:
“The idea was that buildings of modern construction were poorly suited to form that ‘bridge of tradition’ to future generations which Hitler was calling for. It was hard to imagine that rusting heaps of rubble could communicate these heroic inspirations which Hitler admired in the monuments of the past. My ‘theory’ was intended to deal with this dilemma. By using special materials and by applying certain principles of statics, we should be able to build structures which even in a state of decay, after hundreds or (such were our reckonings) thousands of years would more or less resemble Roman models.
To illustrate my ideas I had a romantic drawing prepared. It showed what the reviewing stand on the Zeppelin Field would look like after generations of neglect, overgrown with ivy, its columns fallen, the walls crumbling here and there, but the outlines still clearly recognizable. In Hitler’s entourage this drawing was regarded as blasphemous. That I could even conceive of a period of decline for the newly founded Reich destined to last a thousand years seemed outrageous to many of Hitler’s closest followers. But he himself accepted my ideas as logical and illuminating. He gave orders that in the future the important buildings of his Reich were to be erected in keeping with the principles of this ‘law of ruins’.”
“Hitler liked to say that the purpose of his building was to transmit his time and its spirit to posterity. Ultimately, all that remained to remind men of the great epochs of history was their monumental architecture, he remarked. What then remained of the emperors of the Roman Empire? What would still give evidence of them today, if not their buildings […] So, today the buildings of the Roman Empire could enable Mussolini to refer to the heroic spirit of Rome when he wanted to inspire his people with the idea of a modern imperium. Our buildings must also speak to the conscience of future generations of Germans. With this argument Hitler also underscored the value of a durable kind of construction.”  –  Inside the Third Reich, Albert Speer

 

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Volkshalle

“Hitler believed that as centuries passed, his huge domed assembly hall would acquire great holy significance and become a hallowed shrine as important to National Socialism as St. Peters in Rome is to Roman Catholicism. Such cultism was at the root of the entire plan.”


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Via Appia Imaginaria

“[Piranesi’s] conception of antiquity was that of a current problem affecting our present existence. Since Piranesi’s time, this idea has been posited more or less consciously against the antithetical attitude that perceived antiquity as irremediably distant, and indeed lost in the past, and that manipulated and celebrated it as a mere facade . . . He was discontented with the contemporary situation in Rome that continued to fall short of its grand past and suffocate the remains of that past in amorphous decay. This was a fragmentary and chaotic Rome, devastated and dominated by archaic rurality, filled with architectural monuments lacking any organic relationship with each other, islands of Renaissance, Counter-Reformation, and Baroque. Basilicas, palaces, and churchs with contrasting styles jostled each other at the expense of what, in Piranesi’s mind, the ancient Romans had realized in grander form, the city in its organic whole – the Urbs.”

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